Program

PLENARY SESSIONS


Marianne Starlander

University of Geneva

An overview of translation tools

During this presentation, we will present an overview of the current computer assisted tool ecosystem with a focus on translation memory, terminology management and speech recognition. This presentation will be followed by a hands-on session to learn how to use Dragon Naturally Speaking.

María Angélica Ramírez Gutiérrez

Intercontinental University

The challenge of translating Mexican films for the Anglophone audience

Translating the geographical and social varieties of Latin American Spanish for the Anglophone audience presents a major challenge not encountered when translating from the so-called standard variety of Spanish into English. The endeavour’s complexity is greater when audiovisual translation is required since glossaries and translator’s notes cannot be inserted into a film explaining the polysemic nature of certain words or their particular uses in specific contexts. This presentation will address some of the problems that must be dealt with when translating Mexican films into English. To do so, Halliday’s systemic functional approach and the Manipulation Theory will be applied to analyse the treatment of register and dialect in the English translation of Como agua para chocolate (Like Water for Chocolate), Amores Perros, and Coco. This analysis will reveal the criteria adopted by the translators in order to handle both linguistic variations, which will in turn shed light on the conventions of the target pole regarding the reception of translated films.

Georganne Weller Ford

The convenience of training in sight translation techniques

Sight translation is a hybrid technique used by both translators and interpreters at a wide array of professional events.  It also serves the purpose of allowing potential clients to examine the main points of a document before making the decision of whether or not to translate it in full. This linguistic feat involves an oral rendition in the target language of a written document from a different source language spontaneously, unrehearsed, and in public, which turns out to be a more difficult linguistic exercise than meets the eye. The paper focuses on the application of theoretical aspects of sight translation to practical considerations, for example:  how to determine the minimum unit of meaning before beginning a sight translation exercise; the use of skimming and scanning; the importance of the characteristics of source language texts for sight translation; and some specific problems the interpreter faces when working from Spanish into English and vice versa.

Luisa Fernanda Salazar Figueras

Secretary owner of CMLTI

Official Presentation of “Colegio Mexicano de Licenciados en Traducción e Interpretación”

Scenario of the profession in Mexico, analysis of the Expert Translators and Interpeters authorized by the Superior Court of Justice of Mexico City. Legal origin of “Colegios Profesionales”: Act regulating Section 5 of the Political Constitution and its Regulations. The need of regulating the profession of translation and interpretation in Mexico. Main purpose of the Colegio. Code of Ethics, main aspects. Guidelines for the Social Service. Homologation of criteria and rates for the customers’ benefit and healthy competence of professionals. Guidelines for Authorized Experts Translators and Interpreters. Call to become a member of the Colegio, requirements.

Miguel Duro Moreno

Autonomous University of Madrid

Humans vs. Machines = The case of Contract translations (English<>Spanish)

Legal translation, as every other type of specialized translation, can be tackled by using a number of computerized tools that usually render it a lot more productive. But can it be done wholly and skillfully by a machine? Can a contract be translated from English into Spanish or from Spanish into English without the involvement of a human brain?

Ana Pérez Manrique

Worcester State University

From the Classroom to the Workplace: A Practical Case in Spanish for the Professions

This presentation is an analysis of how to integrate translation into the world language curriculum from a real case by relating concepts, data, and situations to aid understanding public service translation and to foster reflection; including activities directed toward research and the implementation of skills and strategies to be applied in the proper training of a public service translator; providing take-home information of outcomes such as Internships, collaboration with other departments, and the creation of a Translation Center, and (4) making it profitable.

Georgina Sánchez Borzani

Intercontinental University

Professionalization’s need of the Audiovisual Translator in Mexico

Simply turn on the television, go to the movies or enter any platform “on demand” to have access to a dubbed audiovisual product, however, despite the great presence of dubbing in the mass media, translators specialized in the area are needed. The translator for Mexican dubbing (who is at the same time the adapter) usually learns empirically and many do not have formal studies in translation or languages. The fact that the dubbing translator learns from trial and error causes the art area, that is, dubbing directors and actors (who are not required to master any language) to adapt on the fly in the recording studios. This phenomenon compromises the senses and communication objectives foreseen by the author, as well as generating translations and adaptations that may not be accurate for the target audience. Therefore, this conference will discuss the need for professionalization of the audiovisual translator in Mexico as a fundamental link to preserve communication functions, improve intercultural communication and workflow in the recording rooms.

Jean Quirion

University of Ottawa

Pedal pushers to data pullers : where will terminology take you?

Would you like to bike to earn university credits? That is what some students at the University of Ottawa have been doing since 2016. Over a two-week,  500 km course on terminology, they pedal their way to numerous professional organizations where they learn about terminology directly from the professionals. The first part of the conference will present this original approach. The second part will introduce terminological databases with Spanish terms, from large governmental ones in Canada to collaborative ones around the world.

Alejandro Gutiérrez Lizardi

Pink Noise México

Localization, dubbing and professional subtitling for audiovisual media

The aim of the presentation is that the assistant knows in a concrete way the phases that involve a process of localization, dubbing and subtitling of quality and its positive impact on the product, as well as identifying how to generate professional products and services for a local market with the most high quality, from common mistakes to launch them in the global market.

Berenice Font Zorrilla

TRANSCREARE

I want to become a professional Translator and Interpreter. How do I get started?

The volume of translations into Mexican Spanish is growing continuously and clients have a hard time finding professional translators and interpreters in our country. It is necessary to be visible so we can be found, and it’s also very important to offer quality services in order to retain our customers. In this talk, we will give clues to reflect on own professional goals and to lay out a strategy to enter the market as a professional translators and interpreters after graduating. We will offer relevant advice as to how to become truly professional, we will talk about clients and how to establish a collaboration with them, and we will give marketing and branding tips for translators and interpreters.

Barbara Bertoni

Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana
A Proposal for Group Translation: the Laboratorio Trādūxit of the Italian Cultural Institute of Mexico City I will share the experiences of the Laboratorio Trādūxit, the collective literary translation workshop from Italian into Spanish, both on-site and online, that has been held since 2015 at the Italian Cultural Institute of Mexico City. In a workshop with participants from other states of Mexico as well as from other Spanish-speaking countries, it is necessary to decide into which Spanish variant to translate, or if it is better to produce a target text in “neutral American Spanish”. In our case, on-site participants translate into Mexican Spanish, but we do not censor non-Mexican participants, instead we encourage them to produce another target text in their own variant of Spanish. Since the workshop is meant both for professional translators and people with no previous experience in translation, I will tackle the difficulties and advantages of working with a very heterogeneous group, as far as academic background, age and profession are regarded.

Gabriel González Núñez

University of Texas at Rio Grande Valley

Translation at the Border: Translation Policy in Brownsville, Texas, a Diglossic City

The U.S./Mexico border is a place where two States, two cultures, and two languages meet. In the U.S. side of said border, English and Spanish coexist and mix in different ways. One trait of this region is that English is in a hegemonic position, and yet Spanish continues to be the language of many. In this context, local authorities face top-down and bottom-up pressures when developing their language policies. These language policies inevitably will have some translation dimension to them. Considering that, this presentation aims to explore Brownsville, Texas, as a case study of these interactions. The talk will explore both the historic and demographic pressures that come to bear on the development of language policy as well as the use of translation and interpreting by local authorities. The paper will present historic and demographic information regarding Brownsville, explain the legal framework within which translation policy is developed, and consider what translation management, practice, and belief actually look like in specific settings.

Antonio Guijarro Donadiós

Worcester State University

From the Classroom to the Workplace: A Practical Case in Spanish for the Professions

This presentation is an analysis of how to integrate translation into the world language curriculum from a real case by relating concepts, data, and situations to aid understanding public service translation and to foster reflection; including activities directed toward research and the implementation of skills and strategies to be applied in the proper training of a public service translator; providing take-home information of outcomes such as Internships, collaboration with other departments, and the creation of a Translation Center, and (4) making it profitable.

Osvaldo Javier Pico

Vice President of CMLTI

Official Presentation of “Colegio Mexicano de Licenciados en Traducción e Interpretación”

Scenario of the profession in Mexico, analysis of the Expert Translators and Interpeters authorized by the Superior Court of Justice of Mexico City. Legal origin of “Colegios Profesionales”: Act regulating Section 5 of the Political Constitution and its Regulations. The need of regulating the profession of translation and interpretation in Mexico. Main purpose of the Colegio. Code of Ethics, main aspects. Guidelines for the Social Service. Homologation of criteria and rates for the customers’ benefit and healthy competence of professionals. Guidelines for Authorized Experts Translators and Interpreters. Call to become a member of the Colegio, requirements.

Workshops


Machine Translation And Post-Editing: Dispelling Myths And Managing Reality

University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign
The use of machine translation and post-editing is a widespread practice, especially in the field of technical translation and increasingly in other areas as well. The goal of this workshop is to dispel some myths about machine translation and to discuss when and where it is an appropriate and feasible option, the extent to which it has been applied successfully in the past, and the best way to design an optimal process with post-editing. Given the prevalence of this technology today, translators and interpreters in training should develop this technological skill in order to be competitive in the current translation market.

Terminology and translation practice in Canada

University of Ottawa
Terminology and translation practice in Canada This workshop will present the current situation of terminology and translation in Canada, from the point of view of university training, market, professional associations, training in and use of various language technologies, and situation of the legal translator. The fascinating links between a society and its dictionaries will also be illustrated through the case of its translators.

SDL Trados Studio 2017 Workshop and certifications

General Director of Babel DGT

Rodrigo has worked as a translator in all kinds of projects, began his career in the audiovisual field with translation for dubbing series and cartoons, was part of projects such as Nights of Guardians of the Bay, Iron Man, Batman of the Future, Dharma & Greg, among many others. Later he started collaborating in translation projects with various translation agencies and direct clients such as Caterpillar, Black & Decker, PeopleSoft, Banamex Cultural Promotion, Microsoft, Expedia, Hotels.com, Toshiba, Alaina, Apple, Intel, Electricity of France, Forbes. In 2002 he started as a reseller of SDL International in Mexico. He has worked on projects of process reengineering, creation of workflows, implementation of existing technologies, development of new technologies and many other technological and project management projects. He currently represents SDL International, sells its products and is certified to certify translators in the use of these technologies. He holds a degree in translation from the Higher Institute of Interpreters and Translators (ISIT) and later specialized in different topics of engineering and technology. He has certifications in project management, network administration, CRM system administration, office automation, application development, among others.

LEGAL TRANSLATOR, TEAM TRANSLATOR = DIGITAL TRANSLATOR

Autonomous University of Madrid
This workshop is aimed at making professional legal translators familiar with several CAT tools so they can work, as members of a team, in large translation projects.

Localization of a website: a new competence of the digital translator

Intercontinental University
In this workshop, the HTML markup language will be introduced, the process of localization a website from a URL to its end will be known. In the same way, the main characteristics of a website and its hierarchical structuring will be described. From a directory, we will localize the index of one or two web pages from English or French into Spanish, as well as its functional components. To do this, we will use a website copier (HTTrack) to extract the directories and a computer-assisted translation tool (memoQ translator pro). Finally, we will visualize and verify the index and the web pages localized to send them to the client.

Tools for digital publishing

Intercontinental University
The workshop will work on basic tools for editing text, images and graphic elements from InDesign, applied to the design of a digital publication.

Consecutive interpretation, beyond the note taking

Intercontinental University
Consecutive interpretations is considered by some as the ugly duckling of the profession, it makes  us feel exposed and vulnerable by being out of the booth, plus developing an adequate note taking technique can be a real struggle. However, this valuable type also helps us to improve other useful and needed skills to boost our simultaneous and take the fear away. The aim of this workshop is to focus on those skills that are left aside in many consecutive workshops that are mainly working on note taking. We will explore, through exercises, all the elements and tools needed for a good consecutive performance.

An overview of translation tools

University of Geneva
During this presentation, we will present an overview of the current computer assisted tool ecosystem with a focus on translation memory, terminology management and speech recognition. This presentation will be followed by a hands-on session to learn how to use Dragon Naturally Speaking.

Legal Translation Fundamentals

University of Texas at Rio Grande Valley
This workshop will cover the essential basics of translating legal texts. It will start by providing a bird’s-eye view of the world’s two leading legal traditions, and it will move on to helpful observations regarding comparative law. Then it will outline a method for legal translation. It will close by showcasing, as practical examples, work on different text types.

Legal interpreting workshop

PROFESSIONAL INTERPRETER AT LIONBRIDGE AND SOS INTERNATIONAL
Legal interpreters, either inside or outside of court, are very important. They assure that people, either witnesses, jury, plaintiff, defendant and or attorneys can communicate among them. It is important that they all the persons that participate in a legal process can understand everything that is said. In this workshop we will review and practice the different interpreting modes that are used in a legal process. Also, we will review the code of ethics of legal interpreters, and we will explore different scenarios on what to do or not in certain situations that legal interpreters confront every day.  

Panels

The profession of translator in Mexico: from Yucatan to Baja California

Frank Pool Cab

PhD. in Educational Technology by the Universidad Da Vinci, a MA in Educational Innovation and BA in Law, Specialized in Education by the Autonomous University of Yucatan, Specialized in Teaching English as a Foreign Language by the University of Cambridge. Mr. Pool is an official Translator and Interpreter authorized by the Council of the Judiciary in the State of Yucatan, he is the president of the Yucatecan Association of Translators and Interpreters; member of the Mexican Organization of Translators and Interpreters; Coordinator and teacher of the Masters Degree in Translation Competencies in the city of Mérida, México. He has participated as a speaker in various editions of the International Conference of Translation and Interpretation “San Jeronimo” organized by the OMT. He participated as a visiting professor of Legal Translation at the Faculty of Philosophy at the Universidad de León in Spain. He has participated in numerous conferences, workshops and seminars on translation and interpretation in the southeastern region of México and also coordinated The First Regional Colloquium on Translation held in Mérida, México in 2017. Besides his career as translator and conference interpreter, Professor Pool has also a long teaching career as a professor of Computers and Law, Legal English, Legal Techniques, and Research Methodology at the Universidad Modelo, and professor of Translation, Instructional Design, Curriculum Design, Design and Development of Materials and Technologies for Language Teaching, at the Autonomous University of Yucatan.

Elena Preciado Gutiérrez

She got a Bachelor’s Degree in Translation at the Universidad Intercontinental. She earned her degree with the thesis: Traducción de algunos poemas de Alain Grandbois (Translation of some poems by Alain Grandbois) in 2007. She was dancer for the Amalia Hernández’s Ballet Folklórico de México for ten years. She got a Master Degree in Pedagogy at INACE, and taught French language at Colegio Hampton. She translated the novel El hijo maldito by Honoré de Balzac, the book of poems Barranca by César Arístides, Los mil y un fantasmas by Alexandre Dumas, Junto a un muerto y otros cuentos de terror by Guy de Maupassant, and some stories by Flaubert, Jack London, Herman Melville, Saki and Charles Dickens, for an anthology about madness called La terrible cordura del idiota. Currently, she works as an external translator for Penguin Random House and Grupo Planeta (Labels: Aguilar, Fontanar, Alamah, Paidós, and Ariel). To date, she has translated 34 books and has visited 17 countries.

Mercedes Guhl

She started translating in 1990, working in the children’s books area of Colombian publishing house Editorial Norma, while completing her university degree in philosophy and literature. Since 1992, she has been involved in different stages of book production, but mostly in translation. After getting her MA in Translation Studies (University of Warwick, UK), she began to teach translation both at undergraduate and graduate levels in Colombian universities, while she continued translating as a freelancer. In 2003 she moved to Mexico and for some years taught in the master’s program at Universidad Autónoma de Guadalajara. She is a member of three translators associations: OMT, ATA and Ametli. She has worked organizing the annual conference of OMT (2008-2017) and as the head of ATA’s Literary Division (2013-2015). She has taught workshops and lectures in Mexico and the US. As a translator, she has worked in books on social sciences, humanities, environment, self-help and, in the past 10 years, she has been almost exclusively into books for children and young adults.

Leticia Valdez Gutiérrez

She holds a PhD and a master’s degree in translation from the University of Granada, Spain; a specialty in English Teaching from the University of Cambridge, England; a bachelor’s degree in English Teaching, and a Translation Diploma from the Autonomous University of Baja California, Mexico. At present, she is responsible for the Specialty in Translation of the School of Languages of the aforementioned university, Tijuana campus, where she is a full-time professor and shares her activities among teaching, researching and academic-administrative management. She has taught both the Bachelor and the Specialty in Translation for several years. Besides that, she belongs to the Research Group in Translation Studies of the same School. Finally, her researching interest are translation training and the translator’s work field; the translation competence; evaluation in translation; Translation Studies, among others.

Krisztina Zimányi

Having completed her studies in English Language and Literature, and Teaching English as a Foreign Language at Eötvös Loránd University of Sciences, Budapest, Hungary, with complementary diplomas in Irish Studies and Literary Translation respectively, Krisztina Zimányi obtained an M.Phil. in Anglo-Irish Literature from Trinity College, Dublin, Ireland and an M.A. in Translation Studies from Dublin City University, Dublin, Ireland, where she also completed her PhD on Community Interpreting in Mental Health Care in Ireland. In the meantime, she taught on the Graduate Certificate in Community Interpreting and various undergraduate courses at the School of Applied Language and Intercultural Studies, also at Dublin City University. Apart from her academic contribution, she worked as a translator and community interpreter in Ireland as well as participated in the activities of the Executive Committee of the Irish Translators and Interpreters’ Association, which included drawing up the Code of Ethics for Community Interpreters. Currently, she is a full-time lecturer at the Department of Languages of the University of Guanajuato where she is involved in foreign language teacher training and the promotion of translator training and translation studies.

Luis Raúl Fernández Acosta

(Moderator)

He holds a Master’s degree in Translation and New Technologies: Software Translation and Multimedia Products English/French>Spanish by the Menéndez Pelayo International University of Madrid, Spain, and in Didactics of French as a Foreign Language by the University of Caen, France. He has a degree in Teaching Foreign Languages ​​from the Benemérita Universidad Autónoma de Puebla and graduated from the now extinct and prestigious Program for the Training of Translators of El Colegio de México. He is a sworn translator French<>Spanish by the Council of the Federal Judiciary and the Superior Court of Justice of Mexico City. He is a certified French<>Spanish translator by the embassies of Canada and France in Mexico. For the past fifteen years, he has trained professional translators by providing courses, seminars in translation, workshops and diploma courses on specialized translation, history and theories of translation, terminology, assisted translation, localization of websites in different institutions and associations (UNAM, Universidad Veracruzana, BUAP, UIA, PGR-INACIPE, CHICATA-Chicago, FUL-Pachuca, Benkyo-kai, Italia Morayta Foundation, OMT-FIL Guadalajara, UAQ, UGTO). As a professional translator, he collaborates with several Mexican and foreign translation agencies. He is currently the academic director of the BA in Translation, coordinates the “Diploma in Specialized Translation and Professional Interpretation” 100% online from the Intercontinental University of Mexico City. He also teaches online in the BA in Translation and Interpreting at the International University of Valencia, Spain.

CHALLENGES OF THE PROFESSION OF THE INTERPRETER IN THE DIGITAL AGE

Gonzalo Celorio Morayta

(Moderator)
While languages are at the core of his professional career, Gonzalo Celorio Morayta has also been closely involved with education, culture, event organization, and administration. He is a member of the Mexican College of Conference Interpreters, for which he has been entrusted with management responsibilities on the Executive Committee over five administrative terms. Currently, Gonzalo is a member of the Admissions Committee. As a translator, he has published with Simon and Schuster—Aguilar, the Fondo de Cultura Económica and El Colegio de Mexico, among others. His textbooks have been published by Richmond Publishing, Santillana, the University of Dayton, and Grupo SM. In addition, Gonzalo has run CM Idiomas for 24 years, a company which evolved from the first association of translators and interpreters in Latin America. Under his leadership, CM Idiomas has become one of the primary providers of language services in the region. Since 2016 he has been Chair of the Executive Committee of the Italia Morayta Foundation. In that role, he leads the organizing committee of the International Forum for Interpreters and Translators Lenguas, which was held for the first time in September 2017. It was in this context that the survey study on translation and interpreting in Mexico, sponsored by the Foundation, was presented. He is currently working on the next edition of Lenguas, which will take place in January 2019.

Tania Berenice Saldivar Alonso

Graduated conference interpreter with a Master’s degree from the Conference Interpreting program from La Laguna University in Tenerife, Spain. Currently working in Mexico with the Spanish – English and Spanish – French combinations. I studied the Major on International Hospitality Management at Universidad del Valle de México, in collaboration with the Glion Institute of Higher Education of Switzerland, and I also attended international French studies in language and culture in Nice, France. Combined with my passion for different cultures and languages, such a multicultural career path allows me to develop different skills in multiple areas from the hospitality and interpretation industries, giving me both the cultural and linguistic knowledge to enrichen my personal and professional background, thus leading me to continuous improvement, fast decision making and teamwork capacities and attitudes. I have been working as an interpreter since 2013, having the opportunity to partake in diverse seminaries, conferences and liaison services within national and international environments (Mexico, Europe, South Africa and the U.S.). Among the institutions I have worked with, you can find non-governmental organizations, such as Amnesty International; several institutions of the Mexican government, such as the Ministry of the Interior, the Ministry of International Affairs, the Ministry of Energy, the General Attorney’s Office, PEMEX, the Ministry of the Environment, DIF Mexico, as well as UN bodies, such as the UNHCHR and the UNEP, just to name a few. My main areas of expertise are finance, energy, environment, tourism and enology, management, human rights and social sciences.

Julieta Cecilia Davila Heres

Born and raised in Mexico City, Julieta Cecilia Davila Heres has worked as interpreter translator from French and English into Spanish. She holds a Master of Arts in Latin American Literature and Culture from Northeastern University and graduated from the Translation Program (PPT) at El Colegio de Mexico, COLMEX in the year 2000. Cecilia has worked as language instructor at CELE UNAM, IFAL and at The Alliance Française in Mexico City and in Chicago. Now residing in the Chicago area, Cecilia has also worked as an independent interpreter-translator and as language instructor at Northeastern University, College of DuPage and Waubonsee College. She is a State Certified Court Interpreter and a Certified Health Care Medical Interpreter. Cecilia served as the President of the Chicago Area Translators and Interpreters Association from 2015 through 2017. She was recently hired to work as full time in-house interpreter-translator for an International non-for-profit organization. And belongs to the 2017 1st online program in Translation and Interpretation at Intercontinental University (UIC) alumni.

Lourdes Pumarejo Felizardo

Although I dreamed of studying a language degree to be an interpreter, I was able to study outside of Tampico and I enrolled in the degree in administration at the Institute of Higher Studies of Tamaulipas where I graduated in 1990. Later I obtained a specialty in tourism in the city of Lausanne in Switzerland. In 2002 I obtained my master’s degree in e-commerce from the Technological Institute of Higher Studies of Monterrey. Since I graduated from IEST in June 1990 to 2010, I devoted myself to administration and teaching. In December of 2011, finally, I obtained my master’s degree in translation and interpretation in Spanish at the University of Texas at Brownsville. My debut as an interpreter was at the Pan American Games (Guadalajara 2011). Upon obtaining my master’s degree, I started working as a telephone interpreter for the CTS Language Link and Certified Languages ​​agencies. I currently work for the Lionbridge agency and SOS International, agencies that mainly provide translation and interpreting services to government agencies in the United States where I have been able to provide services such as the United States Department of Homeland Security, the Executive Office for the Immigration Review of the Internal Revenue Service (IRS), FEMA (Federal Administration in cases of Emergency) and the DEA (Federal Anti-narcotics Agency).